HOME‎ > ‎

News

Late U.S. Senator’s commitment to education lives on in school that carries his name

posted Oct 24, 2016, 1:13 PM by Technology Coordinator


By Hawaii State Department of Education, posted Oct. 17, 2016


​​​The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) celebrated the renaming of Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School, formerly Hale Kula Elementary, this morning with a special ceremony and unveiling of the school’s multimillion-dollar renovation. The Hawaii State Board of Education approved the renaming earlier this year in honor of the late US Senator and his contributions to public education and military-impacted families and students in Hawaii.


“Senator Inouye was a stanch supporter of our public schools, and his commitment to education has resulted in millions of dollars in federal resources for our students," said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “It is an honor to name the school after Hawaii’s beloved Senator, and we are proud to be able to carry on his legacy through the work of our administrators, teachers and students.”


Daniel K. Inouye Elementary is located at Schofield Barracks, which was the home the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the unit that Senator Inouye served in during World War II. The school recently underwent a $33.2 million dollar renovation, which was funded largely by the U.S. Department of Defense ($26.6 million) and HIDOE ($6.6 million). The upgrades included a new two-story classroom building, student center, additional classrooms, library-media center, a new covered play court, and facelifts to the administration building and existing classrooms. 


“This school has historic ties to Senator Inouye,”Principal Jan Iwase said. “This school was opened in 1959 when Hawaii became a state and Senator Inouye was first elected to Washington. He always cared about education and the military, and this campus is a combination of both.”


Ken Inouye shared that his father would be grateful for the naming of the school adding, “My father would always say that education isn’t just about learning –it’s about transformation.”


The senator’s family donated several items to the school that are featured for students and visitors to see, including Senator Inouye’s Purple Heart, photos and military coins he earned in the military as given while a lawmaker.


Major General Christopher Cavoli praised the renaming of the school stating, “His legacy showed each of us that service is at the heart of a community. I don’t believe there is a more fitting role-model for the students who learn within these walls.”


The school’s new buildings include state of the art designs that allow for natural lighting, and heat reducing roofing material. ​


Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School currently services more than 800 students from special education pre-school to fifth grade. For more information about the school, visit http://www.inouye.k12.hi.us/

Schofield Barracks school renamed to honor late Senator Inouye

posted Oct 24, 2016, 1:11 PM by Technology Coordinator


By KITV, Maleko McDonnell, posted Oct. 17, 2016


Daniel K. Inouye Elementary, formerly known as Hale Kula Elementary celebrated it's new namesake and welcomed some innovative campus improvements.


Since 1959, Hale Kula Elementary has been teaching Army children inside Schofield Barracks. Schofield housed the legendary 442nd Regimental Combat team, the unit that Senator Daniel Inouye served in during World War II. Today, the student body consists of 99-percent military dependents.


Senator Mazie Hirono was there for the dedication ceremony. "I think this school is very representative of the commitment that Senator Inouye had. Particularly, combining support for our military dependents children, and this school being on a military facility, and his support for education and how foundational education is."


As chair of the senate Appropriations Subcommittee, Senator Inouye played a big part in getting the funding to repair schools for military children.


The school recently received 26-point-6 million-dollars from the U.S. Department of Defense and 6-point-6 million-dollars from the Hawaii State Department of Education to upgrade and add new buildings to the school. 


Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi says "This is a partnership between the department of defense which funded I think about 80% of the cost of the new construction and we as a state had to match that." The building designs were done with the natural environment in mind "They are positioned so that we can capture the natural tradewinds. The play court for example, the covered play court has huge fans and the sides are open with screens so that its breezy and much cooler inside. It's energy efficient and thoughtful design."


The second quarter begins tomorrow at Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School.

Wahiawa school renamed in honor of late U.S. Sen. Inouye

posted Oct 24, 2016, 1:01 PM by Technology Coordinator   [ updated Oct 24, 2016, 1:09 PM ]


By Hawaii News Now, Mileka Lincoln, posted Oct. 17, 2016


A Hawaii elementary school was officially rededicated Monday in honor of one of Hawaii's most influential and powerful Congressional leaders: the late U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye.


The state Board of Education approved the re-naming of the former Hale Kula Elementary School at Schofield Barracks back in April, but military dignitaries, elected officials and community leaders gathered on campus Monday morning for a special dedication ceremony.


"For the sons and daughters of soldiers to get to go to a school named after such a remarkable role model is truly a great thing and for that we are very grateful," said Maj. Gen. Christopher Cavoli, commanding general of 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks.


The elementary school may have a new name, but it comes with a lot of history.

The school was built in 1959, the year Hawaii became a state and also the year Inouye was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.


Its location on Schofield Barracks was the home of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the unit that Inouye served in during World War II. For his service, he was awarded the Purple Heart, which is now on display on campus.


"He always said that education was not just about learning. Education is transformational," said Inouye's son, Ken.


Inouye died in 2012 at the age of 88.


And officials say Inouye's dedication to students has dramatically transformed this campus.


"Senator Inouye was really the guiding light behind the appropriations and the idea of supporting our schools on military bases," said U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii.


The school recently got $33.2 million from the Department of Defense and state Department of Education to upgrade and add classrooms, and build a new library and play court for students. Some 99 percent of students who attend the schools come from military families.


"I think for the students now and in the future, they didn't really know who Daniel K. Inouye was, but now they will know who he is and I think that's very important for his legacy and for what he did for Hawai'i and for the United States," said school Principal Jan Iwase.

Renovated Schofield Barracks school renamed Daniel K. Inouye Elementary

posted Oct 24, 2016, 12:58 PM by Technology Coordinator   [ updated Oct 24, 2016, 1:07 PM ]

The state Department of Education celebrated Monday the renaming of Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School, formerly Hale Kula Elementary, with a special ceremony and unveiling of the school’s multimillion-dollar renovation.


The Board of Education approved the renaming earlier this year in honor of the late U.S. senator. The school is located at Schofield Barracks, which was the home the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the unit that Senator Inouye served in during World War II.


It recently underwent a $33.2 million dollar renovation, which was funded largely by the U.S. Department of Defense ($26.6 million) and the DOE ($6.6 million). The upgrades included a new two-story classroom building, student center, additional classrooms, library-media center, a new covered play court, and facelifts to the administration building and existing classrooms.


The school’s new buildings include state of the art designs that allow for natural lighting, and heat reducing roofing material.


“This school has historic ties to Senator Inouye,”Principal Jan Iwase said. “This school was opened in 1959 when Hawaii became a state and Senator Inouye was first elected to Washington. He always cared about education and the military, and this campus is a combination of both.”


The senator’s family donated several items to the school that are featured for students and visitors to see, including Senator Inouye’s Purple Heart, photos and military coins he earned in the military as given while a lawmaker.


Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School currently services more than 800 students from special education pre-school to fifth grade.


Elementary school at Schofield is renamed for Inouye

posted Oct 24, 2016, 12:43 PM by Technology Coordinator   [ updated Oct 24, 2016, 12:55 PM by Rachel Armstrong ]


By Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Nanea Kalani, posted Oct. 18, 2016


An elementary school serving mostly military families on Schofield Barracks now bears the name of the late U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, who was remembered Monday during a ceremony at the campus as a staunch supporter of education and the military.


Inouye, a highly decorated World War II veteran and the second-longest-serving U.S. senator in history, died in December 2012 at age 88. Schofield was the home of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, for which Inouye volunteered during the war.


Monday’s renaming event and a blessing coincided with the recent completion of a $33 million renovation project that added several new buildings and upgraded aging facilities at the Wahiawa school, which is nearly 60 years old. Inouye is credited with helping direct federal dollars to schools serving military dependents.


“As a graduate of McKinley High School and a true public servant for the people of Hawaii, Sen. Inouye was a staunch supporter of our public schools,”said Kathryn Matayoshi, superintendent of the Department of Education.


First lady Dawn Ige said the school reflects Inouye’s support for 21st-century learning, civics education and international teachings. “It is fitting that Sen. Inouye’s name graces this school that is preparing students to make their own stand on the state, the nation and the global community,”she said.


The school, formerly called Hale Kula Elementary, was built in 1959 and has an enrollment of close to 800 students who are mostly military dependents. The state Board of Education voted earlier this year to rename the school Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School. Signage has since been added to reflect the change.


“This school has historic ties to Sen. Inouye,”said Jan Iwase, the school’s principal. “This school was opened in 1959 when Hawaii became a state and Sen. Inouye was first elected to Washington. He always cared about education and the military, and this campus is a combination of both.”


The school’s multimillion-dollar renovations, which began in 2013, resulted in a new two-story classroom building, additional classrooms, a library/media center and student center, a covered play-court, and upgrades to the administration building and existing classrooms.


The school’s facilities had ranked ninth worst among the 160 schools the Department of Defense studied in 2011. Schools were rated on their physical condition and capacity to accommodate students. The 12 worst-rated schools were invited to apply for federal grants.


The Defense Department had awarded the school a $26.6 million grant as part of a $250 million effort to upgrade public schools on military bases nationwide. The state DOE provided $6.6 million in matching funds.


Military officials called the school’s renaming fitting.


“This building is a big deal for a couple of reasons. First of all, I think it might be the nicest building on post right now,”said Maj. Gen. Christopher Cavoli, commanding general of 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks. “But it’s also a great school because of the name. …(Inouye’s) lifetime of service to his country and to the people of this state is truly remarkable. …For the sons and daughters of soldiers to get to go to a school named after such a remarkable role model is truly a great thing.”


U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono said two other Hawaii schools were cited in the rankings —Solomon Elementary at Wheeler Army Airfield and Mokapu Elementary at Marine Corps Base Hawaii —and promised to continue working to secure funding for all schools serving military families here.


“Sen. Inouye was really the guiding light behind the appropriations and the idea of supporting our schools on military bases,”she said. “And it’s not the kind of funding that normally occurs unless there’s a champion like Sen. Inouye. …I think the senator had a tremendous vision about what we need to do to support our children.”


Ken Inouye, son of the late senator, thanked officials for the honor. He said in preparing his remarks, he wondered what his father would think of the occasion.


“I think the first thing he would think to say is ‘thank you,’”Inouye said. “And the next thing I think he would say is, as beautiful as these facilities are and as much work and machinations and maneuvering of the legislative process, every element it took to make all of this happen, the real payoff here comes in seeing it put into use and seeing the hardworking people of this school making it all happen. …You bring this place to life.”






BOE approves renaming of Hale Kula Elementary to honor Senator Daniel K. Inouye

posted Apr 29, 2016, 3:11 PM by Technology Coordinator


World War II veterans visit 4th, 5th graders

posted Dec 18, 2015, 2:31 PM by Megan Cummings

Thank you, Hawaii Army Weekly, for sharing our students' experiences with the World War II veterans.


Every Day Counts

posted Sep 25, 2015, 1:47 PM by Rachel Armstrong

Army leaders encourage parents to take an active role in their military children's education, including attending parent/teacher conferences, maintaining positive relationships, ensuring class attendance and completing Federal Survey Cards.

Created and distributed courtesy of U.S. Army Hawaii.


Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) 6 Years!

posted Jun 25, 2015, 12:49 PM by Technology Coordinator


The Western Association of Schools and Colleges accredited us for another 6 years with a mid-term one-day visit.  This is validation of our self-study report as well as our recommended next actions in the next few years. 

A special thank you to Lynele Basug and Jason Kawaguchi for co-chairing our WASC team and to the co-chairs of our focus groups - Jerilynn Schaefer, Jessica Soares, Alyssa Tanaka, Kelly Nii, Tami Sego, Rachel Armstrong, Carmen Pita, Phyllis Durante, Gregg Miller, and Janelyn Gamiao. 

Mahalo, also to our school community for your continued support of Hale Kula Elementary School!

1-10 of 11